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Yaounde military court orders radio journalist to be held for at least 6 months
8, May 2018 Cameroonian authorities must immediately release broadcaster Akumbom Elvis McCarthy from detention and ensure that the country’s military courts are not used to prosecute journalists, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today. A military tribunal on April 10 ordered that McCarthy, a news broadcaster for Abakwa FM Radio, a privately owned broadcaster based in Cameroon’s Bamenda region, be remanded in custody for a renewable six-month period while police investigate claims that the journalist aired secessionist propaganda, a person familiar with the details of the case, who asked not to be named for fear of reprisal, told CPJ.   A military tribunal ordered radio journalist Akumbom Elvis McCarthy to be detained. (Credit withhel . . .
BBC honours Nigerian police officer who has ‘never collected bribe’
  6, May 2018   A 2017 survey by the Nigerian Bureau of Statistics (NBS) identified officers of the Nigeria police force as among the most corrupt public officials in the country, mostly due to bribery. But amid that distasteful record, one officer stands out among his peers in the force. Julius Adedeji is said to have never taken a bribe — not because he has never been offered such but because it is “needless” for him. And for that rare feat, the BBC is celebrating him as Nigeria’s ‘most dedicated police officer’. In an interview, he told BBC that he was surprised receiving the award because he did not know he was being watched. “I thank God that it’s recognised and I feel like putting my best more . . .
Southern Cameroons villages have been transformed into battle fields
  6, May 2018   The critical situation of the English regions of Cameroon is worse than ever. The violence has brought the country into a civil war in the South Western region as reported by Lilian Neg, Africa Correspondent for NewsVoice. Other sources tell NewsVoice young men flee the anglophone regions since the army capture and abduct them. If they do not flee they will ”disappear”. The declaration of war made by President Paul Biya on November 30th 2017 to the people considered as enemies of the Republic has not been a means of peace and stability, instead the battle between Cameroonian armed forces and the various separatists groups is building up. Villages have been transformed into battle fields where exchan . . .
Where Are the 47 Political Exiles Sent by Nigeria to Cameroon?
By Chidi Odinkalu  & Tem Fuh Mbuh | April 24, 2018 …it is necessary to verify the whereabouts and safety of these 47 individuals, and to guarantee them access to redress. Pending these steps, the United Nations organs should reaffirm the inviolability of the principle of non-refoulement and require Nigeria — a country with tens of thousands of refugees of its own — to provide verifiable guarantees that it is prepared to comply with this vital international principle. Over the past few months, thousands of refugees from Cameroon have fled across the country’s western border into Nigeria, escaping an increasingly vicious conflict that has been largely unnoticed outside the region. Hundreds of civilians have been killed; many more have been t . . .
Cameroonian Lady Who Disappeared In Nigeria 28 Years Ago While Writing WASCE Narrate her story Cameroonian Lady Who Disappeared In Nigeria 28 Years Ago While Writing WASCE Narrate her story
  24 April, 2018   EDUCATION NEWS – Latest update as in 1990, Martha Eyong, a Cameroonian, was 16 years old when she came to Nigeria to write the West African School Certificate Examination (WASC) in Calabar, Cross River State.   Meanwhile according to a report by newsmen, the young woman had come in the company of few friends who were also natives of Cameroon to write the same examination. But four days after their coming and having written some papers, Martha’s path crossed that of one Alhaji Aliyu Ameh, who allegedly hypnotised her with a powdery substance and took her away, first to Lagos and then to settle with him in Otukpo, Benue State.   Ameh was alleged to have raped his victim and put her in the family way while ens . . .
Cameroon’s ghost president
April 24, 2018 AFRICAN ARGUMENTS | Emmanuel Freudenthal | On the podium for the World’s Longest-Serving President, Paul Biya currently holds the silver medal. At an impressive 35-plus years in office, the Cameroonian leader’s ability to keep hold of power over the decades has been remarkable – perhaps all the more so because of how little he actually exercises it.   In our recent investigation with the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, we found that Biya has spent huge chunks of his presidency outside Cameroon. In some years, he has been abroad for a third of the time. Overall, he has spent at least four and a half years on “brief private visits to Europe”, often at the 5-star Intercontinental Hote . . .
The 2018 Draft Is an African Immigrant Story
                      By Connor Orr | April 24, 2018 The ekwang is so good, Natalie Cabinda says, that if you taste it in her native Cameroon you won’t want to eat anything else again. Ever.  She doesn’t make it as often here in her spacious home in western New Jersey, although the local ShopRite has surprised her at times with a stock of cocoyam, an essential ingredient to the rich stew of boiled beef, fish and greens. It takes time—hours for the onions, peppers and spices to marry with the broth and tenderize the proteins—and Natalie Cabinda has never had much time for anything that didn’t involve making a better life for someone else. When . . .
What A Day Of Food Looks Like Amid War And Drought In Cameroon
  By Adele Peters | April 24, 2018 A stereotypical photo depicting hunger in sub-Saharan Africa might show a gaunt victim. When photographer Chris de Bode traveled to Cameroon–in an area where conflict, drought, and a swelling population of refugees have led to ongoing food shortages–he focused on the food instead. On one plate, with rice, mango leaves, and maize, we see the half-eaten meal of a family that fled from a village on the border with Nigeria when armed men attacked. They now live in a makeshift refugee camp, but there isn’t enough food; after begging, they’ve managed to gather one meal for the day for seven people. This is a bowl of “super cereal.” This milky liquid is an em . . .
Canada announces funding for humanitarian assistance in Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria
10 April 2018 Canada is providing assistance to address the critical needs of the more than 20 million people who are affected by drought, food shortages and ongoing conflict in the Lake Chad Basin YAOUNDE, Cameroon, April 10, 2018/APO Group/ -- On behalf of the Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, Matt DeCourcey, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, today announced over $27 million in funding to humanitarian partners to support people in Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria.   Canada is providing assistance to address the critical needs of the more than 20 million people who are affected by drought, food shortages and ongoing conflict in the Lake . . .
Caught between a rock and hard place: African students in the city
By Tania Thomas | 10 April, 2018 BENGALURU: Bill, a student from Cameroon, came to Bengaluru to pursue his studies in 2009.  Although he was promised top-class facilities and a dream platform to pursue his career in football, his piped dreams came crashing down. The hostel where he was put up, failed to even provide a bed or a mattress to students. Along with that, he was subjected to racial stereotyping, making the process of gelling into the Indian society and curriculum, much harder than expected. Apart from racial attacks and the feeling of being treated like an outsider (he was even called an alien once), matters got worse for Bill, when he had to cope with the political  situation back home and completing his education here in Bengaluru. The main . . .